MANNISH TONGUES, JAYY DODD

“Infinite Black mothers / wailing in daylight for safe return / infinite Black children / breathing broken & wild to be put down” (“Infinite Monkey Theorem” lines 4-7).

tumblr_oite0owu4z1ubxemko1_1280This week, I’ve been spending time with Mannish Tongues, a debut poetry collection by Jayy Dodd. The haunting and beautiful poems inside Mannish Tongues are nothing short of stunning. These poems offer readers a new way to examine the black body and to bear witness to survival. The prologue of Mannish Tongues includes a quote from Essex Hemphill that states “I’m faced daily with choosing violence / or a demeanor that saves every other life / but my own.” These poems rebel against silence, becoming a powerful testament for speech and language, for empowerment, and for the identities we inhabit.

From the beginning of Mannish Tongues to the end, Dodd’s mastery of language is electrifying. There’s a natural rhythm to Dodd’s words, and the play on form keeps readers on their toes. In the poem “There’s Something bout being Raised in Church” Dodd writes: “our knees know something bout aching, / bout singing in jail cells” (lines 28-29). Through this poem, the speaker examines the church and its role in their upbringing, while also reflecting on the importance of language: “Every language I learned was in verse, translated / across all kinds of salvation” (lines 7-8). The careful articulation and weaving together of family, history, and discourse is what makes reading Mannish Tongues so compelling.

The strong voice in Mannish Tongues places the body front and center, forcing readers to bear witness to the consequences of the identities we hold. The poem “Physical Education” challenges our ideas of manhood. It is written as a prose poem and utilizes white space, giving readers a chance to slow down and really take in each word:”He will learn to not cry in the echo of middle school laughter. He will know bruised throat & swollen wrist as rough housing.” This poem is just one example of the astounding fearlessness in Dodd’s voice and in this collection as a whole.

Mannish Tongues is split into six sections: Confessions, Prayers, Interrogations, Testimonies, Myths, and Eulogies. When I interviewed Dodd, they mentioned one of their influences as Danez Smith. Both Mannish Tongues and [Insert] Boy leave you a little more broken after you’ve read them, but for good reason. This is an important collection to read, and worth every second of readers’ time.

Check out my interview with Dodd here.

Buy Mannish Tongues here.

*As part of my goal to promote small presses, here is some information about Platypus Press: “Platypus Press is a boutique publisher based in England. We seek to unearth innovative contemporary poetry and prose from a broad variety of voices and experiences.”

(photo of Mannish Tongues courtesy of Platypus Press)

UGLY TIME, SARAH GALVIN

GALVIN-COVER-FOR-WEBIt’s not everyday that I get to read a collection as hilarious as Ugly Time by Sarah Galvin. I have so much appreciation for the humor in this book. It seriously saved my life this week. Upon opening Ugly Time, I couldn’t have known that I had 90 pages about human genitalia, cowboys, rubber band ukulele’s, and lots and lots of butts to look forward to. The genius in Galvin’s writing is that she is able to balance all of these elements while staying true to the emotional turmoil the speaker feels at various points in the collection. Most of the poems in Ugly Time are short, funny, and sassy, making them perfect for when you’re having an especially shitty week. These poems are like that really blunt and sarcastic friend you want to have with you at a party when things go haywire real quick.

In the poem “Why ‘Lexicon Devil’ By the Germs is Better than the Entire Indie Genre'” the speaker states: “From building a garage-sized house wallpapered with gay porn I learned I can do anything. This may be why I tried to kill Donald Trump with my house keys, a self defense technique I learned from Oprah.” This poem captures all of the feels associated with having Donald Trump as president right now. The closer the poem gets to the end, the more satisfaction one feels about imagining taking out Donald Trump with house keys: “To finish him off, we had to hold hands with children dressed in 1980’s tennis tracksuits.” The amusing and random images, coupled with the political message in this poem makes this collection hard not to love.

The charming wit and humor doesn’t slow down in Ugly Time. Neither does the vulgarity, which is oftentimes coupled with weird and wacky images. In the poem “You Deserve an Entourage” the speaker states “You deserve an entourage, and anyone who doesn’t see that can set their dick on fire.” This is a speaker who actually gives no fucks, who does not ask or need your permission, who is so unabashedly herself that nothing will stop her. This is what makes Ugly Time so refreshing, and why everyone needs to read this damn book.

Galvins’ poems will shock you. They are meant to. Every page in Ugly Time delivers a punch, making this one of the most refreshing collections I’ve read. When choosing whether to laugh or die, here is a group of poems that choose to laugh over and over again.

Check out my interview with Galvin here.

Buy Ugly Time here.

*As part of my goal to promote small presses, here is some information about Gramma Press: “Established in 2016, Gramma Poetry is an independent press that publishes a diverse array of poetry, both online and in print. Gramma seeks to broaden its audience and to be poetry ambassadors by collaborating with people and organizations in other art mediums. Gramma Editors are based in Seattle, Portland, Boise, Boston, and Berlin.”

(photo of Ugly Time courtesy of Gramma Press)

IRL, TOMMY PICO

IRL_COVER.inddHappy March, friends! I hope everyone is enjoying a (hopefully) quick end to the cold weather. I’m ready for spring, and I started this month out in the most refreshing way: By reading IRL by Tommy Pico. This hilarious and dizzying collection is a great read for anyone looking for a unique spin on poetry. Composed as one long epic poem that is written as a text message, IRL follows Teebs, a queer and Native American boy as he attempts to navigate the world. The language is oftentimes disjointed and messy, and the poem is written in a stream of consciousness kind of way. The speaker effortlessly moves in and out of topics. At points he utilizes Beyoncé lyrics, text message acronyms (LOL), and conversation on Grindr, as well lengthy reflections about Muse. Then, he’ll switch to talking about his Native American ancestry, and offers readers an emotionally compelling discussion about his family and the reservation he grew up in.

I enjoyed IRL because the language is fresh and interesting. I like the choppiness of the writing and how it’s used to evoke the anxieties of the speaker: “Surely Muse will want / to kiss me bc I appear / disinterested in kissing” (36). The pop culture references, which are not commonly used in poems, are utilized to introduce the world of Teebs, which is social media obsessed and ridden with hipster ideals: “Tweets my sushi brings / all the boys to the yard” (50). This is definitely a collection that will be enjoyed by millennial readers because they will catch the social media and texting language it presents.

I also appreciated the way the speaker reflects on the California reservation he grew up in. The anger Teebs feels about the mistreatment of his family and people is fully expressed within the poem. Teebs also seems to struggle with honoring his ancestors and dealing with the guilt he feels about leaving the reservation: “In a poem Sherman Alexie / gives me permission / to leave the reservation I / cut my long hair” (46). The contradictions this speaker feels are shown through the jumbled nature of the writing, and the sadness he expresses is raw and honest: “Kill / the Indian, Save the Man – Sow / a shame so deep it arrives / when I do, it waits for me” (73). Pico does an outstanding job of balancing these contradictions and ideas in IRL, while staying true to the form and style of the collection.

IRL is about 100 pages of poetry. It’s a long, continuous poem with few breaks. When I first opened IRL, I thought I would hate it, but Pico’s writing style and voice keeps you reading further and further. The language will feel jumbled at first, but there’s a rhythm and movement to Pico’s words that is addicting and fun. The unique voice  is worth checking out – and I think readers will appreciate the wittiness and humor in IRL.

Buy IRL here.

*As part of my goal to promote small presses, here is some information about Birds LLC: “Birds, LLC is an independent poetry press based out of Austin, Minneapolis, New York, and Raleigh. Specializing in close author relationships, Birds, LLC believes that great books are a collaboration of editors and authors. Birds, LLC supports readings, events, and podcasts for its authors, believing that poetry demands a human voice to read it, and an audience to hear it.”

(photo of IRL courtesy of Birds LLC)

FIELD GUIDE TO THE END OF THE WORLD, JEANNINE HALL GAILEY

field-guide-mediumMy favorite thing about opening up a collection like Jeannine Hall Gailey’s Field Guide to the End of the World is being delightfully surprised at finding poems about teen vampires, John Cusack, alien autopsies, and magic mirrors. From the first poem, the speaker warns us that “we cannot sleep too far from disaster zones” (“Introduction to Disaster Preparedness” line 12). Each poem after this is meant to surprise and humor readers as we prepare for imminent destruction. But don’t let it fool you, because among the wit and many warnings that fill these poems, Field Guide to the End of the World is full of the hope and survival we need during the inevitable setbacks of our lives. And thank goodness for Gailey, because I couldn’t ask for a better instruction manual to carry with me.

One of the poems that I enjoyed in Field Guide to the End of the World was “Lessons in Emergency.” The speaker does a great job of creating a sense of urgency and panic by asking questions and urging readers to construct their own emergency evacuation plan. Despite this poem serving to remind readers of their own mortality and fragility, it stays lighthearted and humorous: “In the end you are still yourself, yourself a little dustier a little blood in the hair, maybe a bit rattled but why are you still clutching the egg-beater in your hands so tight, your fingers still touched with flour?” (13). I love the voice in this poem (and collection) because of its whimsical and chatty nature, and I think “Lessons in Emergency” really captures the energy in the speaker’s voice.

In the poem “Introduction to Spy Narrative as Love Story” the speaker’s playfulness emerges  yet again. The dark images in the poem are brilliantly balanced with odd image that shock readers and create tension within the text. One of my favorite lines in the collection as a whole is “I’ve hidden my gun // in a container of ice cream that’s calling me” (lines 3-4). These moments in Field Guide to the End of the World are what make it such a dazzling collection to read.

Field Guide to the End of the World is split into five sections: Disaster Studies, Cultural Anthropology, Hard Science, A Primer for your Personal Genome Project, and End Times Eschatology. The cover is stunning, and as soon as I saw it at AWP, I knew I had to buy it.

Buy Field Guide to the End of the World here.

*As part of my goal to promote small presses, here is some information about Moon City Press: Moon City Press is a joint venture of the Missouri State University Departments of English and Art and Design. With series lists in “Arts and Letters” and “Ozarks History and Culture,” Moon City books feature collaborations between students and faculty over the various aspects of publication: research, writing, editing, layout and design.”

(photo of Field Guide to the End of the World courtesy of Moon City Press)

#AWP17

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Hi friends!

I hope everyone is rested after all of the AWP madness last week. What an exciting time! I had a blast meeting some of my favorite poets, like Sandra Simonds, Kaveh Akbar, Danez Smith, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, and Emilia Phillips. And despite making a fool of myself in front of all of them (I’m really good at this) seeing them made my month. This was my first AWP, so it was a special time and a great way to launch into the giant world of literary mayhem. I was so happy to be at AWP that I bought TWENTY FIVE poetry collections. TWENTY FIVE. So, needless to say, featuring awesome poetry collections on this blog for the next few months will not be a problem. Here’s a couple of the books that I bought that I’m looking forward to reading and writing about:

  • Because When God is Too Busy: Haiti, Me, & the World by Gina Athena Ulysse.
  • Further Problems with Pleasure by Sandra Simonds.
  • Field Guide to the End of the World by Jeannine Hall Gailey
  • I’m So Fine by Khadijah Queen
  • Ugly Time by Sarah Galvin
  • Mad Woman by Shara McCallum
  • For Filthy Women Who Worry About Disappointing God by Seema Yasmin
  • Portrait of the Alcoholic by Kaveh Akbar

I’m biased, but I do think I had the best AWP book haul! Aside from spending hours browsing the book fair, I also spent some time at a few really fabulous panels. The American Smooth: A Tribute to Rita Dove panel had me laughing and crying all over the place. Jericho Brown read (or rather cried through) the powerful Letter to the Editor by Rita Dove  which protests the lack of black poets in Garrison Keillor’s anthology Good Poems (2004). I encourage you to click on the link above and read it. Brown explained how much this letter meant and still means to him today. Another great panel I attended was the Writing the Dual Self: Opening Spaces for Hybrid Identities. Panelists discussed what having a hybrid identity means, and Thrity Umrigar said “I wear the hyphen like a rose.” These words struck me, and I keep them in mind when I’m writing now. Other helpful panels I attended include We all Have to Start Somewhere: How Bad Writing Gets Good and Page Meets Stage16708403_736749439815406_7767143907815017065_n.jpg

I have so much gratitude for all of the panelists, organizers, and press editors who helped me find the wonderful collections I bought and all of the swag I came home with. The panels I attended gave me so much to think about, and I found them to be very helpful. I was overwhelmed by all of the beautiful events and people I was surrounded with for those three days. Thanks so much to all, and I can’t wait to see you all again next year in Tampa, Florida.

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AWP17 MADNESS

Friends,

AWP17 has been a blast! I’m still recovering from all the madness / amazingness. Check back next week for a full post about my first AWP and all of the adventures I had in D.C the last few days. I hope everyone reading this is getting some rest and having a safe trip back home.

Thanks,

NPP

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Preparing for AWP

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AWP is in a few days and I am so excited to be attending! This is my first time at the conference, and I’m grateful for the opportunity to meet some of my favorite poets and writers. The book fair will give me a chance to restock on poetry collections for this blog, too.

Here’s a few panels / speakers I’m enthusiastic about seeing:

  • Criticism or Poetry? Poetry Reviewing Today: Thu, Feb 9 from 1:30-2:45 PM with Andrew Ciotola, Kyle Dargan, Shara Lessley, Kaveh Akbar, and Kelly Forsythe.
  • Keynote Address by Azar Nafisi: Thu, Feb 9 from 8:30-10:00 PM.
  • A World of our Own – Women’s Voices from Three Continents in Cultural Exchange: Fri, Feb 9 from 12:00-1:15 PM with Tess Barry, Jan Beatty, Eleanor Hooker, Zeina Hashem Beck, and Clodagh Beresford Dunne.
  • Page Meets Stage: Fri, Feb 10 from 4:30-5:45 PM with Taylor Mali, Sarah Kay, Carolyn Forch, Nicole Homer, and Derrick Brown
  • The Art and Importance of the Poetry Interview: Sat, Feb 11 from 9:00-10:15 AM with Kaveh Akbar, Melissa Studdard, Emilia Phillips, Lindsay Gsrbutt, and Hafizah Geter.
  • A Reading by Rita Dove, Terrance Hayes, and Ocean Vuong: Sat, Feb 11 from 8:30-10:00PM.

Also, on Friday, February 10th, I’ll be reading for Diode Poetry Journal alongside the magazines and journals posted in the flyer above.

Be sure to download the AWP17 application, and follow NPP on Facebook here. I’ll be posting photos on the FB page, as well as my Twitter.

LOOK, SOLMAZ SHARIF

12079778_10106285764738939_240672169261332420_oI’m always amazed when finding out that a poetry collection I’m in love with is a debut. I spend a lot of time on this blog promoting debuts because so many of them are armed with the social and political fervor that makes reading poetry an act of resistance. 2017 is the year poetry and art will save us, and Solmaz Sharif’s collection Look reminded me why. At a time when we are desensitized to cruelty, finding truth and humanity is difficult. Look demands our attention, and holds us accountable for our nation’s brutality. In Look, Sharif uses the United States Department of Defense’s Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms to craft poems that alarm and dismantle. These are poems that take the American invasion of Afghanistan and Iraq and make this war into something personal. This collection forces us to bear witness, and to understand the importance of our words and the way we use language.

In the poem “Desired Appreciation” the speaker confronts her own “learned helplessness:” “Am I grateful to be here? Someone eventually asks / If I love this country” (lines 8-9). What I find interesting about this poem is that the speaker protests her own obedience to America, and starts the poem off by arguing against the harmlessness of her Muses’ poetry. It makes a direct statement towards arts’ responsibility to challenge injustice. It also speaks for immigrants who oftentimes do not vocalize their disagreement against this country for fear of appearing unpatriotic in a place where they already feel they are unwelcome.

Sharif’s brilliant use of the Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms throughout Look also calls for celebration. Her creative manipulation of these words can be seen in the poem “Safe House:” “Sanctuary where we don’t have to / Sanitize hands or words or knives, don’t have to use a / Scale each morning, worried we take up too much space” (lines 1-3). By using these words, Sharif strips them of their power, making the political personal.

To say that Look is an important collection would be an understatement. It’s a powerful declaration against complacency: “I place a photograph of my uncle on my desktop computer, which means I learn to ignore it” (“Personal Effects”).

Buy Look here.

*As part of my goal to promote small presses, here is some information about Graywolf Press: “Graywolf Press is a leading independent publisher committed to the discovery and energetic publication of contemporary American and international literature. We champion outstanding writers at all stages of their careers to ensure that diverse voices can be heard in a crowded marketplace.”*

(photo of Look courtesy of Graywolf Press)

 

BORN PALESTINIAN, BORN BLACK, SUHEIR HAMMAD

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Drawing from her Palestinian roots, as well as her experiences of growing up in Brookryn, poet Suheir Hammad’s collection, Born Palestinian, Born Black shows readers what it means to struggle as a woman, as a Palestinian, and as an immigrant. Hammad’s strong voice takes us to the broken streets of Brooklyn, the war torn Palestine, and the intimate conflicts that make up this speakers’ friendships and family. She breaks traditional poetry rules, oftentimes embracing the language of the street. Here, Hammad offers us a personal account of poverty, war, and survival.

From the beginning, this collection holds nothing back. The language is unflinching, and oftentimes shocking.  The speaker immediately pulls readers out of their comfort zones. In the poem “blood stitched time” the speaker reflects on the ongoing crisis in Palestinian: “stand under the strain of false peace jammed up hopes / we speak with dried olive branches / caught in chests” (lines 34-36). The speaker, mourning, says she is tired of “watching kids get bombed and blown” (line 25). Then, we are taken back to the streets of Brooklyn, where the speaker says the following about her people’s refugee statuses in the United States: “whose mouth was jammed silent / with food stamps in brooklyn” (lines 42-43). I love Hammad’s writing because of its rawness and uncleanliness. Her words don’t try to be pretty in their protest, but you can count on each poem delivering a lot of truth.

In the poem “99 cent lipstick” the speaker looks back at the harsh streets of Brooklyn that raised her. She laments the friends she lost to jail and drugs, and reflects on the ways “we killed each other with / a fear that wasn’t even ours” (lines 69-70). The language in this poem is accessible to many. Through Born Palestinian, Born Black Hammad creates a space where everyone can grieve, and where she shows us that suffering is something we all feel. The speaker is doesn’t forget her origin, and pays homage to Brooklyn, and to Palestine.

Born Palestinian, Born Black took me a few days to read. I was amazed by Hammad’s voice and urgency. Each poem has a life of its own, a movement that is uniquely hers. The collection was originally published in 1996 by Harlem River Press, but was reprinted in 2010 by UpSet Press (The University of Arkansas Press is the distributor of Upset Press).

Buy Born Palestinian, Born Black here. 

*As part of my goal to promote small presses, here is some information about UpSet Press: “UPSET PRESS is an independent press based in Brooklyn.The original impetus of the press was to upset the status quo through literature. The press has expanded its mission to promote new work by new authors; the first works, or complete works, of established authors, including restoring to print new editions of important texts; and first time translations of works into English. Overall, the Press endeavors to advance authors’ innovative visions and bodies of work that engender new directions in literature.”

View Suheir Hammad on TED Talk below:

PRELUDE TO BRUISE, SAEED JONES

Layout 1Happy 2017, friends! Thanks for being patient during this break. I’m back this week in great company with Prelude to Bruise by Saeed Jones. It’s not everyday that I read a collection as thrilling as this one. Every poem (no exaggeration) in Prelude to Bruise is straight fire. Jones’ writing is brutally honest, so much so that it hurt to read this collection at points. The emotion here is strong and loud, and the poems are disturbing, oftentimes taking readers out of their comfort zones and into the psych of a young black queer boy. Through Boy, issues of sexuality, identity, and race are questioned.

One of the first poems that blew me away in Prelude to Bruise is “Boy at Edge of Woods.” In just 11 lines, it’s one of many poems that demonstrates Jones’ handle on craft and image. By the end of “Boy at Edge of Woods” I realized I’d forgotten to breathe, which happens a lot while reading this collection: ” . . . I relearn my legs, mud – / stained knees, and walk back / to my burning house” (lines 9-11). This poem introduces readers to the sexually charged nature of Prelude to Bruise, as well as its focus on the body, which serves as a motif throughout the book.

Familial issues are also focused on in Prelude to Bruise. The character of Father and the tension between Boy and Father appear multiple times. In the poem “Boy in a Whalebone Corset” we find Father burning Boys’ “sissy” clothes: “Corset still on, / nothing else, I’m at the window; / he’s in the field, gasoline jug” (lines 20-22). The poems that discuss Father hold nothing back, and the speaker does not cloak the abuse and aggression.

One of the last poems in the collection is written as a prose poem and is one of the most emotionally charged poems I’ve ever read. Time stopped while I was reading “History According to Boy.” I didn’t realize I was crying until I reached the end of it. Over the course of 12 pages, the speaker walks us through Boys’ adolescence. It takes place at school where Boy is bullied, a chatroom where Boy attempts to explore his sexuality, a gay dance club where Boy meets Stranger, and at home where Boy confronts Father. One of the last lines of the poem is “Boy has a name.” This is a great penultimate poem for Prelude to Bruise.

I think Prelude to Bruise is a testament to the power of poetry and storytelling. These poems break the silence in a way that is loud and brutal. Jones’ writing is haunting, and this collection is not something you will quickly forget.

Buy Prelude to Bruise here.

*As part of my goal to promote small presses, here is some information about Coffee House Press: “Coffee House Press is an internationally renowned independent book publisher and arts nonprofit based in Minneapolis, MN; through their literary publications and Books in Action program, CHP acts as a catalyst and connector—between authors and readers, ideas and resources, creativity and community, inspiration and action.”

(Photo of Prelude to Bruise courtesy of Coffee House Press)